MedStatix

Patient Experience Insights Lead to Increased Satisfaction

Continuous measurement of the patient experience and taking action on those insights will improve patient satisfaction.

Abstract:

Analysis of current MedStatix survey data reveals that both providers and practices show steady improvement on key patient experience measurements. Improvement is seen in these key areas:

  • MedStatix Loyalty Score
  • Provider Rating
  • Provider Recommendability
  • Practice Recommendability
  • Communication with patients
  • Customer service
  • Overall practice atmosphere

MedStatix
MedStatix

Changing the Patient Experience

MedStatix Case Studies on the Organizational Impact of Patient Feedback

Abstract:

In this paper we’ll look at two case studies from healthcare organizations that have realized the immense value of patient feedback. Their stories show how the MedStatix platform has led to improvements in patient satisfaction, how practices have used the platform to engage patients more in their own care, and how MedStatix data resulted in significant organizational improvements within a practice.

MedStatix

How Detractors and Promoters Affect Loyalty

Comparison of NPS® to Doctor Satisfaction Rating and Doctor Recommendations

Abstract:

Analysis of current MedStatix survey data reveals that Net Promoter Score® is a better predictor of reputation and loyalty. The data reveals that comparing detractors to promoters shows a larger difference in those that would recommend and those that would give negative word-of-mouth.

    • MedStatix Loyalty Score
    • Provider Rating
    • Provider Recommendability

MedStatix MedStatix MedStatix

Readmissions in the Era of Patient Engagement

Improved patient satisfaction is associated with decreased 30-day readmission rates and that patient-centered communication may improve health outcomes and reduce expenditures.

Abstract

The patient perspective on readmissions is lacking in the literature despite evidence that improved patient satisfaction is associated with decreased 30-day readmission rates and that patient-centered communication may improve health outcomes and reduce expenditures. In the emerging era of patient engagement in which patients increasingly desire to participate in their medical care, patient perspectives on readmissions warrant further investigation. We aimed to illuminate the patient voice on readmissions, focusing on factors that patients associate with preventable readmissions and the extent to which patients and physicians agree on readmission preventability.

JAMA Internal Medicine, 32(7):1299-1305 – 2014

MedStatix

Relationship Between Patient Satisfaction With Inpatient Care and Hospital Readmission Within 30 Days

Higher overall patient satisfaction and satisfaction with discharge planning are associated with lower 30-day risk-standardized hospital readmission rates after adjusting for clinical quality. This finding suggests that patient-centered information can have an important role in the evaluation and management of hospital performance.

Objectives

To determine whether hospitals where patients report higher overall satisfaction with their interactions among the hospital and staff and specifically their experience with the discharge process are more likely to have lower 30-day readmission rates after adjustment for hospital clinical performance.

Study Design

Among patients 18 years or older, an observational analysis was conducted using Hospital Compare data on clinical performance, patient satisfaction, and 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia for the period July 2005 through June 2008.

Methods

A hospital-level multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed for each of 3 clinical conditions to determine the relationship between patient-reported measures of their satisfaction with the hospital stay and staff and the discharge process and 30-day readmission rates, while controlling for clinical performance.

Results

In samples ranging from 1798 hospitals for acute myocardial infarction to 2562 hospitals for pneumonia, higher hospital-level patient satisfaction scores ( overall and for discharge planning) were independently associated with lower 30-day readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction ( odds ratio [ OR] for readmission per interquartile improvement in hospital score, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-0.99), heart failure ( OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.95-0.97), and pneumonia ( OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99). These improvements were between 1.6 and 4.9 times higher than those for the 3 clinical performance measures.

Conclusions

Higher overall patient satisfaction and satisfaction with discharge planning are associated with lower 30-day risk-standardized hospital readmission rates after adjusting for clinical quality. This finding suggests that patient-centered information can have an important role in the evaluation and management of hospital performance. ( Am J Manag Care. 2011; 17(1):41-48).

American Journal of Managed Care, 32(7):1299-1305 – 2011

MedStatix

An Agenda For Improving Compassionate Care: A Survey Shows About Half Of Patients Say Such Care Is Missing

Our survey of 800 recently hospitalized patients and 510 physicians found broad agreement that compassionate care is “very important” to successful medical treatment. However, only 53 percent of patients and 58 percent of physicians said that the health care system generally provides compassionate care. Given strong evidence that such care improves health outcomes and patients’ care experiences, we recommend that national quality standards include measures of compassionate care.

Abstract

As the US health care system undergoes restructuring and pressure to reduce costs intensifies, patients worry that they will receive less compassionate care. So do health care providers. Our survey of 800 recently hospitalized patients and 510 physicians found broad agreement that compassionate care is “very important” to successful medical treatment. However, only 53 percent of patients and 58 percent of physicians said that the health care system generally provides compassionate care. Given strong evidence that such care improves health outcomes and patients’ care experiences, we recommend that national quality standards include measures of compassionate care; that such care be a priority for comparative effectiveness research to determine which aspects have the most influence on patients’ care experiences, health outcomes, and perceptions of health-related quality of life; and that payers reward the provision of such care. We also recommend the development of systematic approaches to help health care professionals improve the skills required for compassionate care.

Health Affairs, 32(7):1299-1305 – 2011

MedStatix

Patient Satisfaction Surveys and Quality of Care: An Information Paper

Because physicians and physician practices aim to deliver care that is both clinically effective and patient centered, it is important to understand the association between the patient experience and quality health outcomes.

Abstract

With passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, payment incentives were created to improve the “value” of health care delivery. Because physicians and physician practices aim to deliver care that is both clinically effective and patient centered, it is important to understand the association between the patient experience and quality health outcomes. Surveys have become a tool with which to quantify the consumer experience. In addition, results of these surveys are playing an increasingly important role in determining hospital payment. Given that the patient experience is being used as a surrogate marker for quality and value of health care delivery, we will review the patient experience-related pay-for-performance programs and effect on emergency medicine, discuss the literature describing the association between quality and the patient-reported experience, and discuss future opportunities for emergency medicine.

Annals of Emergency Medicine, 32(7):1299-1305 – 2014